Editorial Board

Advisory Board

Aim & Scope

Call for Papers

Submission Guidelines

Journal Store

SLAVERY TODAY JOURNAL Advisory Board

Dr. Kevin Bales

Dr. Kevin Bales is Professor of Contemporary Slavery at the University of Nottingham and co-founder of Free the Slaves. His Pulitzer-nominated book Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy was named one of “100 World-Changing Discoveries” by the Association of British Universities in 2006. The film based on Disposable People, which he co-wrote, won a Peabody Award and two Emmy Awards. Bales has advised the US, British, Irish, Norwegian, and Nepali governments, as well as the ECOWAS Community, on slavery and human trafficking policy. In 2005 he published Understanding Global Slavery, an edited collection of Bales’ academic articles.

Following the publication of Ending Slavery: How We Free Today’s Slaves (2007), Bales was invited to address the Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates in Paris. After reading Ending Slavery, President Clinton told the plenary session of the Clinton Global Initiative: “It tells you that it is a problem we can solve, and here’s how to do it.” In 2011, Ending Slavery won the $100,000 Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Promoting World Order.

In 2008, with Zoe Trodd, he published To Plead Our Own Cause: Personal Stories by Today’s Slaves; and with seven Magnum photographers, Documenting Disposable People: Contemporary Global Slavery. In 2009, with Ron Soodalter, published The Slave Next Door: Human Trafficking and Slavery in America Today. He is currently writing on the relationship between slavery and environmental destruction; building a global slavery index with Monti Datta and, with Jody Sarich, a book exploring forced marriage worldwide.

Dr. Mohamed Y. Mattar

Dr. Mohamed Y. Mattar’s professional expertise is in comparative and international law, especially international human rights law. Recognized as an international expert on anti-trafficking legislation, Dr. Mattar has worked over 15 years in more than 75 countries, including countries in the Middle East, to promote state compliance with international human rights standards and to advise governments on drafting, implementing, and enforcing anti-trafficking legislation and related human rights laws. Dr. Mattar leads the work of The Protection Project on trafficking in persons; clinical education; corporate social responsibility; legal reform; the promotion of religious dialogue; enhancing civil society capacity; and human rights education.

Dr. Mattar has testified in the United States on the status of human trafficking around the world at various Congressional Hearings, including the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission; the Helsinki Committee for Security and Cooperation; the House Committee on Government Reform, Subcommittee on Human Rights and Wellness; the House Committee on International Relations, Subcommittee on International Terrorism, Nonproliferation and Human Rights; and the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Property Rights. He also testified before the Russian Duma, the Mexican Senate, as well as the Egyptian Parliament. He has served as a member of numerous United Nations expert groups, as well as an expert advisor to the League of Arab States. He drafted the Inter-Parlimentarian Handbook on the Appropriate Responses to the Problem of Trafficking in Persons.

Dr. Mattar teaches courses on International Trafficking in Persons; Corporate Social Responsibility; International Contract Law; Comparative Contract Law; Contract Drafting Techniques; Investment and Trade Laws of the Middle East; Islamic Law; Introduction to the American Legal System; International Business and Human Rights; International Arbitration; and International Human Rights: Theory and Practice. Dr. Mattar co-teaches the International Human Rights Clinic at SAIS, which he founded. He is also the founder and editor-in-chief of The Protection Project Journal of Human Rights and Civil Society. He is adjunct professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center and American University College of Law, and a non-resident distinguished professor of law at Alexandria University.

Cory Smith

Cory Smith has been a long time advocate for vulnerable populations by protecting human rights, immigrant rights, civil rights and civil liberties through federal legislation, appropriations and executive branch measures. Currently Cory works for the private foundation Humanity United (HU) established by the Omidyars who founded E-bay.   HU seeks to end mass atrocities and modern day slavery by investing in NGOs in the U.S. and abroad.

Cory served as the Executive Director and Advocacy Director for Enough, a project to end genocide and mass atrocities at the Center for American Progress and was the Deputy Campaign Manager for the Coalition for Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CCIR), the campaign that led efforts to overhaul the U.S. immigration system.  He also served as Legislative Counsel for Human Rights First in Washington, DC and  as a Policy Analyst at the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights (LCCR), the nation’s oldest, largest and most diverse civil rights coaltion.

Cory has written for the Washington Post and appeared in articles in the Boston Globe, the Baltimore Sun, and Associated Press among others. Recent publications include the Not on Our Watch Christian CompanionDarfur Catholic Companion and Discussion Guide and Faithful Against Torture. He holds a J.D. from the University of Oregon School of Law (2000) is a member of the Washington State Bar Association and an Adjunct Professor of Law at the University of New Hampshire School of Law.

Phil Marshall

Phil Marshall is an anti-trafficking specialist with more than 20 years working in developing countries. He was the first Regional Project Manager of the UN Inter-Agency Project on Human Trafficking (UNIAP) and subsequently worked closely on the development of the Coordinated Mekong Ministerial Initiative against Trafficking (COMMIT). He has undertaken more than 30 short-term assignments on human trafficking covering prevention, apprehension and prosecution of traffickers and support for victims. He is currently focusing on emerging approaches to trafficking prevention including work to target exploitative supply chains and the use of behavioral theory to help develop more focused and measurable programs. He was a member of the expert group to finalize the UN Principles and Guidelines on Human Rights and Human trafficking, and of a small advisory group for the development of the Global Slavery Index. He is a Director of the Mekong Club, a private sector initiative against modern forms of slavery.

Tina Davis

Tina Davis is an international award-winning documentary maker, PhD Candidate, and board member of the Norwegian Anti-Slavery Association. Her main focus as a filmmaker has been human rights issues and her feature length documentary Modern Slavery lead her to do extensive research and film in ten different countries including lengthy fieldwork in Cambodia, India, north Uganda and France.

She has a BA in media from University of Westminster. During her longstanding career in the TV and film industry she has worked as a researcher, director, producer and at one point she was leading one of Norway’s biggest TV production companies. She was instrumental in setting up the documentary course at The International School of Film and Television in Cuba where she was a visiting professor for two years. She has also lead documentary workshops in Norway, Uganda and Australia. Her work as a human rights advocate lead her to become one of the initial leaders of the global Man Up Campaign to stop violence against women and girls where she facilitated human trafficking workshops in South Africa.

She has given seminars in contemporary slavery at The Wilberforce Institute for the Study and Emancipation (WISE), University of Hull, for the human rights course at University of Sydney, and for the law department at University Technology Sydney, as well as visiting a large number of high schools, universities, organisations and businesses across Norway. Her anti-slavery work has also been introduced in the Norwegian Parliament and been made into educational packages for organisations and schools in Norway and UK. She was one of the ambassadors for Body Shop’s international campaign to stop sex trafficking of children and young people, which became the biggest campaign of its kind with over 7 million signatures that was presented to the UN. Currently she is a PhD Candidate at University of Sydney where she is doing research on forced labour with a special interest in Australia. She is also writing a book about human trafficking in Norway. In her responsibility as a board member of the Norwegian Anti-Slavery Association she is working on a proposal to improve the current Norwegian Human Trafficking Act.

Stephen M. Apatow

Stephen M. Apatow is president and founder of the UN NGO Humanitarian Resource Institute. Programs include the Humanitarian University Consortium that serves as an international community of scholars, a bridge between Humanitarian Resource Institute and the international academic community, a think tank in support of the United Nations programs and the promotion of higher learning through both traditional and distance education. He is also the founder of the United Nations Arts Initiative, connecting educators and artists, who have the innovation, creativity and connection to the grassroots level in 193 UN member countries. Arts Integration Into Education focuses on prioritized humanitarian emergencies and relief operations through direct participation with strategic planning, critical analysis, expert think tank development for background discussions, peer reviewed data compilation and communications that engage decision makers and audiences in a target demographic. In 2011, he established H-II OPSEC Expeditionary Operations, to provide defense support for humanitarian and security emergencies, currently beyond the capabilities of governmental, UN, NGO and relief organizations.